Do your vegetables suffer from calcium deficiency?

I’ve just returned from some vacation days together with my family. While we were out travelling we saw several beautiful and interesting gardens. And as you can imagine, I always get inspired when I get the chance to visit other beautiful gardens.

However, I also saw some gardens that certainly didn’t seem to thrive very well. Now, I know that there can be many reasons why the plants in a garden don’t thrive, but I just read about one cause that many gardeners aren’t aware of – calcium deficiency.

This deficiency is very widespread and it can do a lot of damage to your plants. In fact, in the article on Examiner.com where I read about this problem, the author, Deborah Aldridge, says that this nutrient deficiency is very common in South Florida.

Crushed eggshells can add calcium to your vegetables
Crushed eggshells can add calcium to your vegetables

When your vegetables suffer from calcium deficiency they don’t grow as well as they should do, and they don’t look as healthy either. The deficiency makes it harder for the plant roots to carry calcium to the rest of the plant.

If your vegetables suffer from calcium deficiency the margins of the young leaves typically get a brown color and get curly. These symptoms may also have other causes, so it’s important not to jump to conclusions. However, if you notice that your vegetables also blossom and rot, then it’s very likely that the cause is calcium deficiency. If you notice these symptoms it’s important that you do something about the problem so that your vegetables don’t get too much damaged – and maybe even die. There may be other symptoms, but these are some of the most common indications of calcium deficiency, says Deborah Aldridge.

How to solve the problem

But what can you do about this problem?

In her article Deborah suggests using crushed eggshells to add calcium to your plants. Eggshells are rich on calcium, and it’s an organic and natural way to add calcium to your plants. Just wash and dry the eggshells before you crush them and distribute them around your plants. But if you have a lot of plants, it may be difficult to get enough eggshells to solve the problem. In that case you can use Lime (for acidic soil) or Calcium sulfate dihydrate (for alkaline soil) to supply the calcium need.

You can read the article here:
http://www.examiner.com/x-8286-South-Florida-Gardening-Examiner~y2010m8d3-How-to-recognize-and-treat-calciium-deficiency-in-organic-vegetables?cid=edition-by-channel-rss-Tampa_Bay-Home_and_Living

Best,
Anette

 

Turned their front yard into a blooming garden

It’s really amazing what you can do with the surplus places in your yard. I just read the really inspiring story, written by Leslie Kuss, about a couple that turned their front yard into a blooming garden with lots of vegetables. Some years ago John and Barbara Ashby decided to change this part of their site. They cut down two trees that stood in front of their house. Then they also dropped their lawn. After they had removed both the trees and their lawn they began to turn the front yard into a garden with vegetables. Their aim was to let their new garden come as close to an organic garden as possible. No chemicals there.

In order to get the best results from their garden they decided to grow the plants in four larger, raised beds. In these beds they grow such vegetables as cucumbers, eggplant, green beans, lettuces, peppers, squash and tomatoes. And to the side they have also placed some smaller beds. In the smaller beds John and Barbara grow squash and melons. According to the article, last year John produced about 750 pounds of vegetables and fruits. The costs? Just $150 that the couple spent on compost, a few plants and some seeds. That’s all. Quite impressive when you consider how much they’ve gotten in return.

You can read the rest of this inspiring account here:
http://www.davislifemagazine.com/2010/07/parterre-of-plenty/

Best,
Anette

An Expert’s Secrets to Growing More Beautiful Roses

Do you like roses? Most people I know do. Personally I love roses, and I have a lot of them in my garden.

I just saw a short but really interesting video by an expert on roses. The gardener, Paul Zimmerman, gives some really good advice on how to grow more beautiful roses. You can view the video here below:

You can read more useful tips on how to cultivate roses on Paul Zimmerman’s blog:

http://www.finegardening.com/item/15858/summer-care-tips-for-your-roses

Best,

Anette

87 Year Old Man Grows Garlic and Stays Young and Energetic

I just read an interesting story about Chester Aaron who has discovered a completely natural way to stay young, healthy and energetic. Chester is 87 years, but he has discovered how to enjoy a healthy and active life, despite his relatively high age.

Garlic
The positive health effects of garlic are really surprising

Chester’s secret is garlic. Every morning he eats three to four cloves of garlic. In most cases, he just eats them in their raw form. However, if the garlic, he eats, is hot, he may add a little bit of honey.

But where does he get all these garlic from? He grows them in his own garden. He grows different kinds and has done so for many years. Every day he spends about three hours in his garden. Actually, Chester is so enthusiastic about growing and eating garlic that he has written three books on the topic.

According to the author of the article, Susan Swartz, Chester “also gargles with it [garlic] to prevent colds, rubs it on his skin to ward off mosquitoes and credits garlic with curing a nasty foot fungus.” And under the Second World War Russian soldiers used garlic to heal their wounds.

Chester also tells that he’s eaten garlic since he was a young boy. He Russian father gave Chester and the rest of the family garlic as a remedy against toothache, earache etc. His father would then take two cloves of garlic, squeeze them and put them into some olive oil. Then he used this mixture on the wounded place. The garlic they used, Chester’s father grew in their small garden.

You can read the article here:
http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/20100725/LIFESTYLE/100729787/1309?p=all&tc=pgall&tc=ar

Best,

Anette